Fusion haiku featuring Basho

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A discarded cicada shell (exoskeleton) posted on Pixabay by “skeeze”

In his ‘fusion’ or ‘crossroads’ haiku challenges Chevrefeuille takes two haiku and invites us to create a new one inspired by both.  His Heeding Haiku prompt for the week proposes a fusion of two Basho haiku translated by Jane Reichhold:

from a treetop

emptiness dropped down

in a cicada shell

~

black forest

whatever you may say

a morning of snow

©️Basho (1644-1694), translated by Reichhold

I have written two haiku, each inspired by both of Basho’s poems.

late summer mayhem

shrill calls from the dark forest

lovers’ armour thrown

~

in wooded shade

peace in another world

tangled mind unwinds

~

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Aokigahara forest in Yamanashi, Japan; photo by “ajari” of Japan, CCA 2.0 license

© 2018 Ontheland

learning to flow

I woke up to the sound of chuckling rain. what a relief, a break from the urgent calls of the sun: come fork mounds of straw off the garden beds! come plant seeds–it’s early spring! come let the seedlings under indoor lamps breathe outside air! come out to mow the grass! I raise the blind and see young blades rising from the earth … they’ll be twice as hard to mow after their feast but what can I do? my body has rebelled, compelled me to rest and so I must.

Easy advice

put to the test again

slow down

Later sunlight returns, fresh leaflets shimmer, birds twitter…no be-twixt and between for them…nor for the cardinal calling from the highest branch.

Kitty cat purrs

Sprawled on resting legs

taking it easy

~

Today Lillian at dVerse invites us to write any kind of poem incorporating two or more brand names. I chose the chocolate category: Chuckles (chuckling rain), Mounds (mounds of straw), Twix (be-twixt) and Kit-Kat (kitty cat). I folded these references into a haibun about my current experience of spring. I am also linking to Haikai Challenge #33: spring rain.

©️2018 Ontheland

spring visitors

The red-domed lady bug makes its way around the edge of the washroom sink. Lower down, near the drain, another one shuffles. I find a piece of paper and lift the second one to a safer place on the window sill. Then I reach for my toothbrush and toothpaste and turn on the tap. What do these tiny bugs feel I wonder. Do they suffer like us if overwhelmed by a torrent of running water?

spring sunshine

life throngs through the window seams

miniature beings

~

©️2018 Ontheland

In response to dVerse Poet’s Pub Haibun Monday: Compassion

a fusion haiku featuring Ozaki Hosai

gazing from the shore

my feelings of want dissolve

with the dying light

©️2018 Ontheland

~

This haiku is inspired by two haiku of Ozaki Hosai (1885-1926) who was part of the free haiku movement in Japan:

on the field

where evening has died out,

my footsteps

~

the heart

that seeks something

I release to the sea

© Ozaki Hosai (revised by Chèvrefeuille)

In response to Carpe Diem Crossroads #9: Ozaki Hosai’s ‘on the field’

Spring troiku

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 Bare branches

waving soft fringes of green

bright chirps from within

a painting against blue sky

etched by sunlight

life longs to return

leaves under my feet

rememberlast autumn

before the snow

~

This is a troiku based on a haiku of Yozakura (1640-1716).  A troiku is composed by writing three new haiku, each starting with a line of a chosen original.  Here is Yozakura’s original haiku (as translated):

bare branches

a painting against the blue sky

leaves under my feet

©Yozakura

The troiku form was developed by Chevrefeuille, host of Carpe Diem Haiku Kai, and my troiku responds to Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #31: Troiku…bare branches. Embedded in the troiku is a series of three haiku (as mentioned above). The first haiku is my response to this week’s Haikai Challenge #32 twittering (saezuri).

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©2018 Ontheland

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