all that remains

the mountain still stands

blades of grass whispering

spring blossom dreams

©️2018 Ontheland

~

My haiku is inspired by these two by Matsuo Bashō (1644-1694):

summer grasses

all that remains

of warriors dreams

© Basho

scent of plum blossoms

on the misty mountain path

a big rising sun

© Basho

~

In response to Carpe Diem’s Crossroads #5 Scent of Plum Blossoms

Art credit: courtesy of Pixabay.com, tagged blossoms

a taste of summer

Candy-stripe lily

thirsting for sweet nectar

of sunlight kisses

~

©️2018 Ontheland

In response to Carpe Diem’s Crossroads #3, I am featuring a day lily I photographed three summers ago. Though it was cloudy last night for March’s blue moon, recent days have been sunny!

Carpe Diem’s Crossroad challenges offer two haiku from which participants create some kind of combination or fusion. This time, the two inspirational haiku were written by Basho and translated by Jane Reichhold:

rabbit-ear iris

how much it looks like

its image in water

© Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold)

a silk tree

even through the leaves weary

of starlight

© Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold)

Meoto Iwa: journey’s end

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Meoto-iwa and Mount Fuji seen from Futami Okitama Shrine in Ise, Mie prefecture, Japan before sunrise by Alpsdate, Creative Commons Licence 4.0

hamaguri no   futami ni wakare    yuku aki zo

a clam
torn from its shell
departing autumn

©Matsuo Basho, translated by Jane Reichhold

….this is the last verse in Basho’s ‘Oku no Hosomichi’ ‘The Narrow Road to the Far North’. Because there are several word plays at work here, the Japanese maintain that there is no way for the poem to be rendered into another language.

~ Chèvrefeuille in Heeding Haiku with Chèvrefeuille, February 21, 2018, Revise it

The challenge here was to “revise” Basho’s haiku even though in its original Japanese there are many wordplays.  After reading Chevrefeuille’s post (link above) and much head scratching, I came up with this simple version:

Beach chestnuts

leaving Futami

at my journey’s end

©2018 Ontheland

Futami, a word used in the Japanese version, is the name of the port where the Wedded Rocks, shown in the photo, are located. Beach chestnuts is an alternative meaning of the words in the first line and possibly could be an image representing the Wedded Rocks.

bidding farewell

tumbling to earth

an apple falls close to the tree

farewell and renewal

©️2018 Ontheland

falling to the ground

a flower closer to the root

bidding farewell

©Matsuo Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold)

~

tears flow

falling to the ground

autumn leaves

©Chèvrefeuille

Chèvrefeuille posed an interesting challenge: “revise” the above haiku by the venerable Basho.  As I understand, a “revision” in this challenge means to express in different words some of the essence of the original haiku. It is thought that Basho wrote his poem when a special teacher died. He makes use of the Japanese proverb, “a flower goes back to its root”. I decided to allude to another saying: “the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree”. In the end, my appreciation grew—for both Basho’s and Chèvrefeuille’s haiku.

back to the root

My poem, a troiku, is based on this haiku by Matsuo Basho:

falling to the ground
a flower closer to the root
bidding farewell

©Basho trans. by Jane Reichhold

~

Troiku:

falling to the ground
changed colours of autumn
floating to the earth

a flower closer to the root
touching its origin
begins a new journey

bidding farewell
sadness mingles with
memories on the breeze

©2017 Ontheland

~

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #5 Troiku

On the river

Floating candles

~

On the river

lights float to the horizon

the dead rejoice

© Basho

~

On the river

we return to the ocean

borne by the flow

.

lights float to the horizon—

spirit dreams flicker

memory in the mist

.

the dead rejoice 

release, reunion with

ocean’s vast embrace

~

Carpe Diem’s Weekend Meditation #3 offers Basho’s above haiku for writing a Troiku  (poem consisting of three haikus each starting with a line of a chosen haiku poem).  

© 2017 Ontheland

Solar eclipse (2)


I composed three haiku in response to a Carpe Diem Utabukoro challenge in which you choose a haiku (your own or someone else’s) and let it be your inspiration. I chose this gem from Japanese haiku master, Basho:

Fire-white halo

at the moment of eclipse

I notice your face 

©Basho

~

My haiku:

Sun lost in shadow

     no passing moon will smother 

           enduring flames

~

Hidden eye

        endures darkness

                with steady gaze

~

Clouded star

         passing gloom cannot

                     hide your charm

~

©2017 Ontheland

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