bug shirts

As heat and humidity increase, populations of bugs, such as mosquitoes, ticks, and stinging flies, are rising—some of them carry West Nile Virus and Lyme Disease. Covering up is essential. My solution is to wear a tube scarf and hat on my head, a netted pullover and netted pants (bug shirt and bug pants) over light summer clothing.

:

netted bug shirt

blocks those bloodsuckers

without spray

:

©️2018 Ontheland

Carpe Diem Summer Retreat 2018, Finding the Way, July 15 to August 14.

Bug shirt (Google Images)

let’s name this – – shadorma sequence

let’s name this
betrayal of trust
egregious
failure to
preserve to perpetuate
air water shelter

let’s name this
non-leadership stance
refusal
to adapt
to mitigate disaster
floods droughts hurricanes

a mother
jailed for death of son
not given
medicine
No charge for head of state who
ignores climate change?

to name is
to take a stand is
to call this
criminal
neglect, perhaps manslaughter
Office abandoned.

~

I wrote this poem after the close of the world climate summit held in Bonn—the leader of the largest carbon emitting nation expressed an intention to withdraw the United States from the international climate agreement.  Despite this stance, an independent delegation of sub-national United States leaders attended to report ongoing efforts by states, cities, businesses and citizens to achieve the carbon emissions target agreed to in the 2015 Paris Agreement.  I am warmed by the words of Fiji’s Prime Minister, who opened the summit with the overall sentiment:  “we must not fail our people”:

The need for urgency is obvious. Our world is in distress from the extreme weather events caused by climate change – destructive hurricanes, fires, floods, droughts, melting ice, and changes to agriculture that threaten our food security. All consistent with the science that now tells us that 2016 was a record year for carbon concentrations in the atmosphere.

All over the world, vast numbers of people are suffering – bewildered by the forces ranged against them. Our job as leaders is to respond to that suffering with all means available to us. This includes our capacity to work together to identify opportunities in the transition we must make.

We must not fail our people. That means using the next two weeks and the year ahead to do everything we can to make the Paris Agreement work and to advance ambition and support for climate action before 2020.

Opening speech of Prime Minister Frank Bainimarama of Fiji, President of the United Nations Climate conference held in Bonn November 6 to 17, 2017 (COP 23)

Key achievements from COP 23

~

©2017 Ontheland

Shadorma November

Looking

air-pollution-1845242_640.jpg

I look and tremble.

When I look away,

it still remains,

an enormous

catastrophe

thriving on

numb complacency

imprisoned wallets

free market mantras

fumes of exhaustion–

we forget who we really are

who we can become.

©2017 Ontheland

Photo of coal plant is in the public domain, made available by Pixabay.

We protect World Peace by supporting Climate Action

 

Climate action and peace.jpg

We attribute ancient hatreds, religious intolerance or simply greed to many of the current conflicts. However, from desertification to eroding shores, climate change has intensified resource scarcity, poverty and hunger. Vast new waves of migration may have a political ignition, but the fuel is climate change, from Africa to Asia. Somehow, even Syria’s conflict can be attributed to the spark of longer-term drought. No continent has been secure, including the more developed ones.

Muhamed Sacirbey

Often war and terror are seen as greater global threats than climate change.  This view does not recognize that environmental stress fuels violent conflict. How?  Global warming creates stressors such as drought, famine, insect infestations, destruction of food supplies and destruction of shelter (think floods, fire, hurricanes).  Such disasters lead to mass migrations.  As Muhamed Sacirbey notes in the above quote, hunger and dislocation are sparks that ignite conflict.

Hunger—conflict—depletion of arable land—conflict—water shortages—conflict—failed crops—conflict—homes destroyed by natural disasters—migration—friction between migrants and natives—conflict—military zones—persecution—migration—conflict.  Food, water, arable land, and places to live are essentials that people fight  for in times of scarcity.

A United Nations Global Trends Report released in June 2016 states that worldwide forced displacement has reached an all-time high: in 2015, one in every 113 humans (65.3 million people) were displaced from their homes due to violence and persecution.

Addressing climate change by reducing carbon emissions promotes World Peace.

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Thank you for reading my Sunday quote post, number 2 in a series of three for a Three Day Quote Challenge. I would like to thank Louise Farrell of Fantasy Raconteur for inviting me.  I love this challenge as it gives me a nudge to do a kind of post that I enjoy.

As  part of the challenge tradition I invite three other bloggers to join in if it strikes their fancy.  Before I list the nominees for this week, I would like to talk about using quotes in posts.  When I first started blogging I was mystified by references to quote challenges until I discovered what it was all about from reading blog posts,  particularly those linked to Writer’s Quote Wednesday Writing Challenge, hosted by Colleen Chesebro and Ronovan Hester.  There are many approaches to using quotes in posts, for example:

  • posting a quote and letting it speak for itself
  • posting a quote and expanding on its meaning or significance, sometimes with information about the author
  • posting a quote to supplement photography (some people come up with amazing combinations)
  • an introductory, tone-setting quote
  • a closing quote
  • using a quote as inspiration for poetry or prose
  • using a quote to enrich the body of a post
  • using your own words as a quote!

If you have a secret desire to try a 3-quote challenge, let me know and I will  nominate you next week. For today I have chosen three nominees who I ask to not feel in any way obliged to follow through—not all bloggers enjoy this type of challenge.  My nominees today are:

Eli Woodbine 

Magarisa of  Becoming Unstuck

Yazek of Successia

The ‘Rules’ or suggested guidelines are:

  1. Thank the person that nominated you.
  2. Post 1-3 quotes each day for 3 consecutive days.
  3. Nominate 3 bloggers each day to participate in the 3-day Quote Challenge.
  4. Have fun.