to write or not to write

Can I write a poem
grazing on
stirring dull residues
of wounds and tears
that clog my spirit?
I could bounce away
but then,
would I not still feel empty?
Perhaps I will stay,
sip cold coffee,
and move my pen.


A poem of exactly 44 words (a ‘quadrille’) for dVerse Poets Pub using the word ‘bounce’. Perhaps not a bouncy take on bounce, but more writing will get me bouncing again.

©2018 Ontheland


How shall

I detain you,

captivate you?

But wait—

is this the question 

I want to ask? or

should I feather

my own words and

hope a fledgling

will take flight?


Today (Tuesday) at dVerse Poet’s Pub Bjorn Rudberg challenges us to write a poem consisting of questions. My first question is inspired by another short but longer poem by Cid Corman.

©2017 Ontheland

chasing butterflies

Summer showers,

prisms of awareness

splash lines on this page


Galaxies repeat,

lights scatter my darkness,

one world my home


Responding to Ontheroadprompts:  “For this week’s prompt let the life and work of Hisajo inspire your creative explorations of haiku and related forms.” Hisajo is a Japanese poet of the early 20th century (1890-1946). To read about her life and writing visit Suzanne’s post at the link above. Her essay includes the following quote and haiku which I found particularly inspiring:

I would like to make a haiku out of what touches my life, what my eyes see, ears hear, what my heart speaks to myself in a strong voice… I want to sketch things that left an impression in the depth of my soul.“

From a Letter Written In Daybreak, 1922 by Sugito Hisajo

chasing butterflies

deep into spring mountains

I have  become lost

                     – Hisajo 


©2017 Ontheland

Soaking up the rays


Soaking up the rays

after choosing ‘right’ cushion

communal pleasure

Moments before this peaceful scene they jostled and jumped from cushion to cushion until everyone settled down.  The fourth cushion could have been occupied, but our orange-haired cat tends to shun community events and the elderly dog currently visiting backed off when cushion selection became hectic (despite my efforts to help out).

I decided to write a haiku today after reading an essay by the late Haiku poet, Jane Reichhold (1937-2016) about composing haiku with a fragment and a phrase.  Her fragment and phrase theory makes sense to me.  Perhaps even more interesting are her words about how she related to haiku writing guidelines.  Here is a small excerpt:

There is, thank goodness, no one way to write a haiku. Though the literature has haiku which we admire and even model our own works on, there is no one style or technique which is absolutely the best. Haiku is too large for that. Haiku has, in its short history been explored and expanded by writers so that now we have a fairly wide range of styles, techniques and methods to investigate.

To read her full essay please visit Carpe Diem Universal Jane #17 fragment and phrase.

©2017 Ontheland

about haiku (2)

Writing about ‘writing haiku’ captured my imagination.  I woke up scribbling yesterday morning:

Poems float gently

in a breeze of syllables

haiku-dusted sky

From hill to valley

rushing waters stir my heart—

cleansing tears bear joy.

A word plops

on a silent pond

haiku ripple.

This is my second response to Carpe Diem Tokubetsudesu Special #1 “The Poet’s Craft”. In this Carpe Diem Haiku Kai episode, guest writer, Kim Russell, invites us to write haiku about writing haiku.