picking apples

from an apple tree

a poem may be plucked

one phrase, then the next

gathering

a ripened abundance

~

This poem started as a haiku and then evolved to five lines which possibly could be considered a gogyohka, a contemporary form of Japanese poetry, introduced by Enta Kusakabe to reduce the restrictions of classical rules such as syllable counts.

Carpe Diem Summer Retreat 2018, Finding the Way, July 15 to August 14

Photo credit: sourced from Pixabay

Revise that haiku

In response to Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #26 Revise that Haiku

Taneda Santoka, known for ‘free verse haiku’, was part of an early-twentieth century trend in Japan that explored free-form haiku composed without traditions such as the 5-7-5 syllabic rule and the seasonal word. In his later years Santoka became a Zen Priest wandering many miles, often begging to survive. Santoka may have written this haiku on one his walking trips:

nonchalantly pissing

off the side of the road

soaking the young weeds

© Taneda Santoka (1882-1940)

I imagined a wandering nun. Her alternative haiku might be:

crouching

in bushes by the road

watering the crabgrass

©️2018 Ontheland

Photographed during Hiroshima commemoration of the bombing, august 6th 2014 by Vanvelthem CédricPhotographed during Hiroshima commemoration of the bombing, August 6th 2014 by Vanvelthem Cédric

the summer moon

there are a lot of paper lanterns

on the street

© Masaoka Shiki (1867-1902)

Imagining the Hiroshima commemorative lantern event years after Shiki’s time, I have written a new version of his haiku:

path of lantern lights

memories of lost souls

under August moon

©️2018 Ontheland

Echoes

When I am challenged to revise a haiku, my reading slows and I perceive several possible meanings….

in the moonlight,

the color and scent of the wisteria

seems far away

© Yosa Buson (1716-1784)

~

this pale winter night

fragrant colours of spring

seem so far away

©️2018 Ontheland

~

a mountain village

under the piled-up snow

the sound of water

© Masaoka Shiki (1867-1902)

~

a mountain village

under a fresh fall of snow

children’s laughter echoes

©️2018 Ontheland

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #24 Revise that Haiku

to write or not to write

Can I write a poem
grazing on
hummus-dipped
breadsticks,
stirring dull residues
of wounds and tears
that clog my spirit?
I could bounce away
but then,
would I not still feel empty?
Perhaps I will stay,
sip cold coffee,
and move my pen.

~

A poem of exactly 44 words (a ‘quadrille’) for dVerse Poets Pub using the word ‘bounce’. Perhaps not a bouncy take on bounce, but more writing will get me bouncing again.

©2018 Ontheland

Questions 

How shall

I detain you,

captivate you?

But wait—

is this the question 

I want to ask? or

should I feather

my own words and

hope a fledgling

will take flight?

~

Today (Tuesday) at dVerse Poet’s Pub Bjorn Rudberg challenges us to write a poem consisting of questions. My first question is inspired by another short but longer poem by Cid Corman.

©2017 Ontheland

chasing butterflies

Summer showers,

prisms of awareness

splash lines on this page

~

Galaxies repeat,

lights scatter my darkness,

one world my home

~

Responding to Ontheroadprompts:  “For this week’s prompt let the life and work of Hisajo inspire your creative explorations of haiku and related forms.” Hisajo is a Japanese poet of the early 20th century (1890-1946). To read about her life and writing visit Suzanne’s post at the link above. Her essay includes the following quote and haiku which I found particularly inspiring:

I would like to make a haiku out of what touches my life, what my eyes see, ears hear, what my heart speaks to myself in a strong voice… I want to sketch things that left an impression in the depth of my soul.“

From a Letter Written In Daybreak, 1922 by Sugito Hisajo

chasing butterflies


deep into spring mountains


I have  become lost
       

                     – Hisajo 

~~~

©2017 Ontheland