cold winds: troiku

cold wind

through our torn paper doors

in the month without gods

©️Yamazaki Sokan 1465-1553

:

cold winds

paper tigers tear to shreds

under a new moon

:

cold winds

raze the landscape

winter is near

.

paper tigers tear to shreds

ribbons scatter in the wind

tangling in treetops

.

under a new moon

eyes wide open in a storm

lend a helping hand

:

©️2018 Ontheland

Background: Carpe Diem’s Leafless Tree #2 episode invites haiku inspired by the haiku of Yamazaki Sokan, quoted above, and a troiku formed from each of the lines of the haiku. Sokan’s haiku was written centuries ago in Japan, addressing the cold conditions of a lunar month known then as ‘the month without gods’. His words made me think of violent acts in North America in recent times and how people sometimes rise to such occasions forming broader and stronger communities.

chrysanthemum moon

Chrysanthemum moon

lighting sad departure

wings etch the sky

: : : : : : : :

Chrysanthemum moon

the vast heavens a stage

this autumn night

.

lighting sad departure

in V-shaped formation

their piercing cries

.

wings etch the sky

grey shadows sliver the moon

how summer has flown!

~

©️2018 Ontheland

In response to Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #44, Troiku Challenge, inspired by two haiku by Buson.

haiku & troiku inspired by Issa

For last weekend’s Troiku Weekend-Meditation Chevrefeuille chose two haiku by Kobayashi Issa (1763-1828):

“…one of the five greatest haiku poets ever. His haiku are known for the simple choice of words, but also for its emotions. Issa had a tough life in which he had to deal with several very hard things…”

First, Issa’s two haiku:

tonight’s moon–

how many mountains resemble

the ones back home?

~

going outside

plum blossoms dive in…

my lucky tea*

~

© Kobayashi Issa (Tr. David G. Lanoue)

*”lucky tea” is the first cup of tea on New Year’s Day.

Second, my haiku inspired by both of Issa’s poems:

~

missing home

I watch blossoms drown

in my tea

~

Third, a troiku, each verse starting with a line from the above haiku:

.

missing home

I long for the Gatineau Hills

in autumn

.

I watch blossoms drown

mourning their fragile beauty

lost in spring showers

.

in my tea

a jasmine flower unfolds

a morning blossom

.

©️2018 Ontheland

In the sunlight, a troiku

in the sunlight

grass crackles underfoot

purple stems shimmer

**********************

in the sunlight

tropical herbs rejoice

basil leaves thicken

.

grass crackles underfoot

long-rooted vines flash yellow

moisture found deep below

.

purple stems shimmer

the wild palette of summer

transformed in sunlight

~

©2018 Ontheland

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #40 Troiku Challenge “a distant mountain”

Whip-poor-will’s call

quiet night

a lone whip-poor-will

calling your name

~

quiet night

porch chimes ring

in the breeze

.

a lone whip-poor-will

rising from dead leaves

its song, an eerie cry

.

calling your name

I shudder in my sleep

the forest quivers

~

My troiku is based on a fusion haiku inspired by two of Basho’s haiku. This was the Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #33 challenge—to write a new haiku inspired by Basho’s (available at the above link) and then to write a troiku using each line of the new poem.

©️2018 Ontheland

Spring troiku

1481D03E-7F40-473F-A395-33BAA541079D

 Bare branches

waving soft fringes of green

bright chirps from within

a painting against blue sky

etched by sunlight

life longs to return

leaves under my feet

rememberlast autumn

before the snow

~

This is a troiku based on a haiku of Yozakura (1640-1716).  A troiku is composed by writing three new haiku, each starting with a line of a chosen original.  Here is Yozakura’s original haiku (as translated):

bare branches

a painting against the blue sky

leaves under my feet

©Yozakura

The troiku form was developed by Chevrefeuille, host of Carpe Diem Haiku Kai, and my troiku responds to Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #31: Troiku…bare branches. Embedded in the troiku is a series of three haiku (as mentioned above). The first haiku is my response to this week’s Haikai Challenge #32 twittering (saezuri).

41B9C7CB-1D5D-47B0-8590-B15B50125189

©2018 Ontheland

.