Whip-poor-will’s call

quiet night

a lone whip-poor-will

calling your name

~

quiet night

porch chimes ring

in the breeze

.

a lone whip-poor-will

rising from dead leaves

its song, an eerie cry

.

calling your name

I shudder in my sleep

the forest quivers

~

My troiku is based on a fusion haiku inspired by two of Basho’s haiku. This was the Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #33 challenge—to write a new haiku inspired by Basho’s (available at the above link) and then to write a troiku using each line of the new poem.

©️2018 Ontheland

Spring troiku

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 Bare branches

waving soft fringes of green

bright chirps from within

a painting against blue sky

etched by sunlight

life longs to return

leaves under my feet

rememberlast autumn

before the snow

~

This is a troiku based on a haiku of Yozakura (1640-1716).  A troiku is composed by writing three new haiku, each starting with a line of a chosen original.  Here is Yozakura’s original haiku (as translated):

bare branches

a painting against the blue sky

leaves under my feet

©Yozakura

The troiku form was developed by Chevrefeuille, host of Carpe Diem Haiku Kai, and my troiku responds to Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #31: Troiku…bare branches. Embedded in the troiku is a series of three haiku (as mentioned above). The first haiku is my response to this week’s Haikai Challenge #32 twittering (saezuri).

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©2018 Ontheland

.

troiku of early spring

After the melt,
beside pale stubbled fields
sandy roads climb

~

After the melt
mountains of black crusted snow
stacked by the plows

Beside pale stubbled fields
memories of summer crops
in breaths of spring

Sandy roads climb…
tree buds begin their journey
into uncharted sky

~

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February 26, 2018

In response to Frank J. Tassone’s Haikai Challenge #22: Barely Spring.

(Roads are sanded to increase traction on winter ice. The debris is eventually washed away by spring rains.)

©2018 Ontheland

lost and found

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lost in the corn fields,
a traffic jam of thoughts
row on row on row

wind turbines chart the sky
unmoved by the passing sun
spun by the breeze

sunset crickets sing
silence as long shadows grow,
a new path appears

~

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The poem is a troiku based on this haiku:

lost in the corn fields
wind turbines chart the sky
sunset crickets sing

The first image is from Pixabay.com and the second is a photo of a calendar page I saved a few years ago.  This is my third and last response to Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #16.

© 2018 Ontheland

back to the root

My poem, a troiku, is based on this haiku by Matsuo Basho:

falling to the ground
a flower closer to the root
bidding farewell

©Basho trans. by Jane Reichhold

~

Troiku:

falling to the ground
changed colours of autumn
floating to the earth

a flower closer to the root
touching its origin
begins a new journey

bidding farewell
sadness mingles with
memories on the breeze

©2017 Ontheland

~

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #5 Troiku

On the river

Floating candles

~

On the river

lights float to the horizon

the dead rejoice

© Basho

~

On the river

we return to the ocean

borne by the flow

.

lights float to the horizon—

spirit dreams flicker

memory in the mist

.

the dead rejoice 

release, reunion with

ocean’s vast embrace

~

Carpe Diem’s Weekend Meditation #3 offers Basho’s above haiku for writing a Troiku  (poem consisting of three haikus each starting with a line of a chosen haiku poem).  

© 2017 Ontheland

A hundred gourds

Image from Tumblr shared on Carpe Diem Haiku Kai
~

A hundred gourds

From the heart

Of one vine

©Chiyo-Ni 1703-1775

A hundred gourds
flowers first transmute to
fertile fruit

from the heart
a hundred seeds
court eternity

of one vine
of one seed, each gourd a taste
of infinity

©2017 Ontheland

In response to Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #2, Troiku ‘a hundred gourds’ the above poem is a ‘troiku’, a form introduced by Chèvrefeuille. Each line of a chosen haiku forms the first line of a verse based on the image of a Russian troika, described below:

 “A troika (meaning: triplet or trio) is a traditional Russian harness driving combination, using three horses abreast, usually pulling a sleigh. It differs from most other three horse combinations in that the horses are harnessed abreast. The middle horse is usually harnessed in a horse collar and shaft bow; the side horses are usually in breastcollar harness. The troika is traditionally driven so that the middle horse trots and the side horses canter; the right hand horse will be on the right lead and the left hand horse on the left lead. The troika was developed in Russia during the 17th century…..” 

~from ‘Troiku: a new form of haiku’ by Chèvrefeuille