wandering

When I first ventured into vegetable gardening I was guided by books. Each step felt tenuous, like treading in the dark. My guide was a carefully drawn plan, each square foot measured, each seed accounted for.  With time I relaxed.  I learned that seeds grow and that I only need to provide water and shelter.

A few years have passed and now what joy! Borage, calendula, dill, sorrel and chives return on their own to resculpt the landscape. This spring, rabbits devoured the first shoots of sunflowers and greens…so I raised the height of the wire fence, used a large removeable barrel to block the entrance, and planted more seeds.  I still make annual plans—plant families rotate from year to year and companions are placed side by side.  Beyond my winter dreaming the real garden emerges in a flow of call and response.

Even with a plan

the path ahead is hidden

mystery unfolds

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Foreground left to right: flowering cilantro, yellow calendula, and winter squash vine; behind is a removeable barrel blocking the opening in the chicken wire fence

Behind the barrel gate

cilantro blooms celebrate

squash vine creeps closer

 ~

In response to Suzanne’s Ontheroad prompt “Step by Step” based on this quote from Monkey King 2: 

You don’t find the path, you make it step by step” 

and this haiku of Basho:

 In the wintry gust

I wander, like Chikusai

the comic poet.
 – from “Matsuo Bashō: The Poetic Spirit, Sabi, and Lightness,” by Makoto Uedo

©2017 Ontheland

 

 

Viper’s Bugloss

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Bees love bugloss blue

snakes do not–they say

it’s a remedy

for their venom, still

Viper’s bugloss could

be their cousin—look

how its red stamens

flicker and feel the

bristle-sting of its

round thick stem and the

leaves, rough and pointed

like long sharp teeth or

oxen tongue. It’s a

witch’s sword in a

taut-rooted rosette

ready to brandish

penta-herb magic.

‘Bugloss’ has Greek origins meaning ox’s tongue. The flowers have five petals, five sepals and five stamens.

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©2017 Ontheland

 

 

Chive flowers

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Lavender-lilac blossoms of spring

lighten my spirit,

perched on slender scapes,

savory aroma of onion wafts,

while rabbit noses turn to sweeter fare,

behind my garden fence.

Each chive blossom is a cluster of 10 to 30 star-shaped florets. A couple of florets are visible in this close-up:

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©2017 Ontheland

Packets of hope: Chamomile

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By Alvesgaspar (via Wikimedia commons)

Drizzle

fairy dust and

April rain, dream white stars

with golden hearts, entice

scents of yellow teas,

seduce and dream

sweet chamomile.

I’m planting German chamomile seeds for the first time this year.  The seeds are so tiny you can barely pinch them for sprinkling (I let them slide off a piece of paper).  The dried flowers, alone or combined with other herbs, are steeped to make relaxing teas.

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©2017 Ontheland.wordpress.com