wandering

When I first ventured into vegetable gardening I was guided by books. Each step felt tenuous, like treading in the dark. My guide was a carefully drawn plan, each square foot measured, each seed accounted for.  With time I relaxed.  I learned that seeds grow and that I only need to provide water and shelter.

A few years have passed and now what joy! Borage, calendula, dill, sorrel and chives return on their own to resculpt the landscape. This spring, rabbits devoured the first shoots of sunflowers and greens…so I raised the height of the wire fence, used a large removeable barrel to block the entrance, and planted more seeds.  I still make annual plans—plant families rotate from year to year and companions are placed side by side.  Beyond my winter dreaming the real garden emerges in a flow of call and response.

Even with a plan

the path ahead is hidden

mystery unfolds

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Foreground left to right: flowering cilantro, yellow calendula, and winter squash vine; behind is a removeable barrel blocking the opening in the chicken wire fence

Behind the barrel gate

cilantro blooms celebrate

squash vine creeps closer

 ~

In response to Suzanne’s Ontheroad prompt “Step by Step” based on this quote from Monkey King 2: 

You don’t find the path, you make it step by step” 

and this haiku of Basho:

 In the wintry gust

I wander, like Chikusai

the comic poet.
 – from “Matsuo Bashō: The Poetic Spirit, Sabi, and Lightness,” by Makoto Uedo

©2017 Ontheland

 

 

Viper’s Bugloss

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Bees love bugloss blue

snakes do not–they say

it’s a remedy

for their venom, still

Viper’s bugloss could

be their cousin—look

how its red stamens

flicker and feel the

bristle-sting of its

round thick stem and the

leaves, rough and pointed

like long sharp teeth or

oxen tongue. It’s a

witch’s sword in a

taut-rooted rosette

ready to brandish

penta-herb magic.

‘Bugloss’ has Greek origins meaning ox’s tongue. The flowers have five petals, five sepals and five stamens.

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©2017 Ontheland

 

 

Chive flowers

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Lavender-lilac blossoms of spring

lighten my spirit,

perched on slender scapes,

savory aroma of onion wafts,

while rabbit noses turn to sweeter fare,

behind my garden fence.

Each chive blossom is a cluster of 10 to 30 star-shaped florets. A couple of florets are visible in this close-up:

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©2017 Ontheland

Packets of hope: Chamomile

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By Alvesgaspar (via Wikimedia commons)

Drizzle

fairy dust and

April rain, dream white stars

with golden hearts, entice

scents of yellow teas,

seduce and dream

sweet chamomile.

I’m planting German chamomile seeds for the first time this year.  The seeds are so tiny you can barely pinch them for sprinkling (I let them slide off a piece of paper).  The dried flowers, alone or combined with other herbs, are steeped to make relaxing teas.

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©2017 Ontheland.wordpress.com

 

Garden sage in bloom

In response to the Daily Post Photo Challenge ‘Partners’.

When I planted garden sage, I was adding to my collection of cooking herbs.  I must admit, I also dreamed of making smudge sticks, but later learned that the varieties of sage used for ceremonial burning are quite different….and it is not pleasant nor healthy to burn garden sage!  I tried a few locations, and finally found one where sage would grow happily.  In fact they took over…this is the third year now and they are a thriving community, bushy and close, sending up multiple spikes of purple flowers.

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This second photo gives a somewhat closer view of the flowers, sharing their stems with many others.

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Plants love to congregate.  It never ceases to amaze me how, when left to their own devices, plants will grow next to and under each other.  Sometimes called weeds, they could be thought of as companions, depending on your perspective at the moment.  The main neighbor shown here is a dogwood bush, visited by spittle bugs, which, I am told, will not damage the plant.  And finally, the most interesting part of this photo for me is the surprise collection of white sage flowers!

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©2016, all rights reserved by ontheland.wordpress.com

End of July Garden Visit

Over the last days of July I collected pictures of what is going on in my vegetable and herb garden:

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The most recent shot, in the top left corner, gives an overview. You can see:

  • a  teepee bearing Fortex green beans. The lower left collage picture gives a closer look at bean plants with calendula flowers in the foreground.  If you look closely, you will be able to see beans hanging between the leaves, well camouflaged;
  • the apparently empty bamboo teepee in front is for Marketmore cucumber plants, not  visible in this shot, but shown in the collage photo at top right;
  • at front right of overview photo, a zucchini plant with huge floppy leaves (Costata Romanesco); yellow dill umbrellas tower behind;
  • at front left there are purple-blue borage plants and nearby,  yellow-flowered calendula;
  •  Sugar Daddy Snap Pea vines, growing on the trellis at the right, were finishing  this week with final  offerings.
  • the bottom right collage picture shows a yellow cherry tomato plant (Blondkopfchen) leaning against a spiral support. There are chive plants to the left.

In the collection of 10 photos below, travelling from top to bottom of each column, starting from the left:  winter squash plants (no flowers yet), a bowl of green beans, a tiny baby cucumber in the foreground, sorrel plant, spinach and swiss chard, red onions, baby green peppers, baby and mature basil plants, zucchinis very ready to  harvest, and cherry tomatoes.

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Borage #2 –Full Photo

This morning I posted Borage’s Star Flowers Attract Bees.  Then I went out into the garden to pick peas and lettuce. While I was there I was able to get this shot of a full borage plant to add to the previous post’s gallery  of flowers and leaves.  Getting a full uncluttered shot hasn’t been easy — this is the best so far. image